News story 3

You work for a magazine and website called City Architecture that focuses on urban buildings. Rework this news story so that it is 600 words long and aimed at your target reader.

 

Hundreds of churches, chapels and synagogues will be added this week to the dismal inventory of historic buildings at risk, after the first attempt by English http://www.guardian.co.uk/culture/heritage”>Heritage to assess the health of England’s places of worship – the largest and most important category of listed buildings.

However the report, to be released on Wednesday, is not as bleak as many feared. It is expected to show that one in nine (11%) of all places of worship are in poor or very poor condition and therefore at risk, based on a representative sample survey of almost 1,500 buildings. The remainder are in fair or good condition, greatly valued both by the worshippers and the surrounding community, and often well supported and maintained through heroic efforts by tiny regular congregations.

Diana Evans, head of places of worship policy at English Heritage, insists that the report and a booklet that has been sent to every listed place of worship in the country carry a message of hope, not despair.

“We are encouraging them to do very small things as well as they possibly can, instead of doing nothing and allowing a very very big job to accumulate. Patch the lead, put the slipped tiles back, clean the gutters. Do not put your head in your hands and hope that a problem will go away, it won’t,” Evans said.

The English Heritage chief executive, Simon Thurley, said the fact that almost 90% of all places of worship were in good condition was “an extraordinary testament to the energy, enthusiasm and hard work of thousands of volunteers up and down the country”. He knows the problems of fundraising and maintenance at first hand: the parish council of his own local church, in King’s Lynn, cunningly elected him to take charge of the building condition, at a meeting held in his absence.

The survey reveals a predictably depressing roll call of rotting timbers, vandalised stained glass windows and stolen roof lead and copper, sagging walls and churches that have had to be closed for fear of the building collapsing on the heads of the congregation. But there are also churches that have found surprising new roles at the heart of their communities, including one in Kent that now houses a flourishing weekly farmer’s market; another in Sheffield now shared by a Methodist, two West African and an Afro-Caribbean church; and one in Herefordshire that shelters the village shop and post office.

The pattern is worse for some types of buildings and places. Considerably more of the highest graded I and II* buildings (14%) are in poor condition, probably because they are older, bigger and more complex to maintain.

Isolated rural churches, such as East Anglia’s extraordinary inheritance of hundreds of medieval churches, and some of the huge Victorian churches built in northern cities for a long-vanished population of densely packed factory workers of the industrial revolution, are particularly problematic.

Generally, inner-city churches are in better health than rural ones, but in Birmingham 28% are at risk, and in Tower Hamlets and Hackney, in London – which have some of the areas of greatest deprivation in Britain – one in five churches are in poor or very poor condition. Synagogues are also at higher than average risk.

Evans said: “Many parishes feel there is nothing they can do to engage the wider community unless they can raise a huge sum to put in toilets and kitchens. There may well not be any way of doing that without prohibitive costs and impinging on significant historic features – but is there anywhere they could put a sideboard-type kitchen cupboard, and just plug in an electric kettle to make a cup of tea? Instead of having events every night, or every week, could they have a great once-a-year concert, by candlelight if necessary.”

Evans knows what she is talking about: she was speaking in a break from the maelstrom of strawberry teas in the churchyard, raising money towards the roof of her vicar husband’s 14th-century church in Rutland.

Three places of worship with problems

• St Barnabas, Birmingham, 1822, Grade II-listed: lost its entire roof and all but one of its famously beautiful stained glass windows in a fire three years ago.

• Prince’s Road synagogue, Liverpool, 1872, the first Grade I-listed synagogue outside London for its exceptional interior: extensive restoration after severe damage in 1979 arson attack, now in need of expensive repairs to roof, masonry, glass and dry rot.

• Colchester Garrison Orthodox church, Essex, 1856, Grade II*-listed: originally a military hospital in the Crimean war, the last of its type, empty and in search of a new user since the army moved out in 2007.

Three with faith in the future

• St Leonard’s, Yarpole, Herefordshire, 14th-century, Grade II*-listed: now open full time and housing the village shop and post office.

• St Giles, Shipbourne, Kent, 1879, Grade II-listed: the last village shop closed 30 years ago, but the church now houses an award-winning weekly farmer’s market.

• St John’s, Belper, Derbyshire, 1260, Grade II-listed: closed as a church in 1986, but now in use as the town council chamber and heritage centre.

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You asked a contributor for a 600-word feature on How to live a healthier life. It has come in at twice the length – 1,122 words. It is also not the right tone. Your magazine aims to give advice in a light- hearted friendly way. Unfortunately you don’t have time to send this back the writer. Analyse what is wrong, and then fix it.

 

Everyone is constantly telling you what to do, from your parents to your friends to the media. Unfortunately hardly anyone tells you that you should be living a healthy life. Don’t be surprised when too much stress, junk food and little exercise take their toll on your body.

Keep the following quote in mind the next time you catch yourself indulging in unhealthy habits.

“Those who think they have no time for healthy eating will sooner or later have to find time for illness.” – Edward Stanley

That being said…here are 10 simple, effective ways that you can apply right now to live a much healthier life:

1- Stop Drinking Alcohol

Alcohol in general is one of the worst things for your body. It damages your organs, drains your energy and contributes to your increase in weight.

Modern society almost expects us to drink, especially when we’re with friends or go out for the night. Drinking becomes a habit from as early as college, when your free nights are spent partying and getting wasted. This bad habit can stick with you for many years after college, and can have a serious effect on your overall health.

Ideally it would be best to cut out alcohol from your life completely, but I know how hard it can be to quit cold turkey.

Start gradually and cut down to 2 beers or glasses of wine per week.

2- Stop smoking

Peer pressure and stress are two of the biggest reasons why people start smoking in the first place, usually not out of free will.

Smoking has absolutely zero health benefits. By smoking you’re not only damaging your own health, but also the health of others around you. And on top of that it’s a pretty expensive habit (I’m talking about just the cost of cigarettes, not even factoring in the future health costs you will probably incur from excessive smoking).

Try to cut down your smoking gradually by reducing the number of cigarettes you smoke each day. Your goal is to stop smoking entirely in order to live a healthier life. If you smoke because you’re stressed, find another way to relieve that stress (E.g. Exercise)

 

3- Eat Fruit And Vegetables Daily

This may sound like the most obvious advice you can think of, but how many people do you know that actually follow it? Do you even follow it?

There is just too much processed and junk food easily available, and with the lack of time and high stress levels it’s just too easy to forget adding fresh fruits and vegetables in your daily diet.

Try to eat at least 3 servings of fruits or vegetables every day. The easiest is to east a piece of fruit as a snack between meals and add some veggies to every meal.

4-Replace Fast Food With Home-Cooked Meals

As I mentioned above, it’s far to easy to get caught in the trap of eating takeaways on a daily basis. I personally caught myself stuck in this habit for a couple of months, ordering pizza, Chinese or McDonald’s every day of the week.

Not only is eating fast food in this manner bad for your long-term health, you can immediately feel how it makes you sluggish and leaves you with little energy throughout the day. Your body needs REAL FOOD.

Cooking takes a little effort, but it’s much more enjoyable and usually costs less than take-outs. You can learn to cook easy healthy dinner recipes in just 10 minutes.

5- Exercise Daily

Do at least 30 minutes of exercise every day (whether it be walking, climbing the stairs or mowing the lawn).

It’s too easy to get caught up in work and the stress of life to remember to exercise every day, especially because you often don’t have the energy to do it after a long day’s work. It may sound contradictory, but exercising actually gives you more energy throughout the day.

If you don’t feel like joining a gym, just take a walk outside, go swimming or do something fun like aerobics, dance classes or tennis.

6- Drink More Water

It’s recommended that you drink at least 8 full glasses of water per day.

I actually know quite a few people who don’t even drink one full glass of water per day. Their liquid intake consists of coffee, tea, soda and alcohol. Of course these drinks contain water, but they contain harmful toxins to the body like sugars, caffeine, acids, artificial flavorants and much more.

Try to cut down on other drinks (except freshly squeezed juices) and replace them with water.

Another useful tip: Drink a full glass of water immediately when you wake up in the morning. It’ll make you feel much better throughout the whole day.

7- Breathe Deeply

Take at least 5 minutes every day to inhale and exhale deeply. Outside in the fresh air would be best.

When you take these 5 minutes, allow yourself to forget about everything around you. Forget your worries, troubles and responsibilities. Concentrate on the process of breathing. Count every breath you take and inhale as much air as can fit into your lungs.

8- Smile More

Stress is one of the worst things for your health, and when you’re stressed…you don’t smile.

Make it a habit to smile as much as you can, on a daily basis. Positivity is contagious, and you never know who’s day you might brighten with your smile. Yup, that’s right, smiling is beneficial for you AND those around you.

9- Leave Your Work At The Office

Don’t take your work home with you.

I know it’s difficult to do, but try to make a clear distinction between work and free time. That way you don’t have too much stress in your life and you can use the time you have free to relax and get the most out of life, instead of being stressed out 24/7.

10-End Negative Relationships

One of the biggest influences on your physical health is your emotional well-being. There will be times for everyone where you find yourself in a relationship (friendship, romantic relationship or work relationship) that is emotionally draining.

You’re being taken advantage of or being used. Maybe you’re giving and not getting back. Maybe the relationship is mutually destructive. Either way…you need to put an end to the negative relationships in your life.

The sooner you cut out the emotional drain, the quicker you’ll feel a relief both mentally and physically. Don’t allow other people to make you miserable and unhealthy.

I’m convinces that if you apply the 10 ways to live healthier that I’ve listed above and there is no doubt that you will become healthier, have more energy and feel happier.

 

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News story 2b

The two members of the Drennan Team England taken to hospital in Merida after a coach accident suffered broken arms, according to the Spanish authorities.

A coach carrying the Drennan Team England angling team to the 2012 World Nation’s Championship has been involved in an accident on a motorway outside Merida in western Spain. Police and ambulances have been called to the scene and are treating some individuals by the roadside. The coach was travelling from the airport to the team’s hotel.

 

The team are favourites going into the competition, which is due to begin on Friday.

 

It is believed that two members of the England team have been taken to hospital, following an accident to their coach. No details have yet been released but it is believed that some 20 people, including team members Will Raison, Alan Scotthorne, Steve Gardner, Sean Ashby, Stuart Conroy and Des Shipp, were aboard the coach when it crashed, as were Mark Downes and Mark Addy, Drennan Team England International Managers.

 

A spokesman for Team England confirmed Will Raison, who ranked sixth in the individual results last year, has broken his left arm. Stuart Conroy has broken his right arm. A back-up squad consisting of John Brown, James Blue and Ed Green was also on the coach. They were not injured.

Drennan Team England has won the competition in five out of the past eight years.

 

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News story 2a

A coach carrying the Drennan Team England angling team to the 2012 World Nation’s Championship has been involved in an accident on a motorway outside Merida in western Spain. Police and ambulances have been called to the scene and are treating some individuals by the roadside. The coach was travelling from the airport to the team’s hotel.

 

The team are favourites going into the competition, which is due to begin on Friday.

 

It is believed that two members of the England team have been taken to hospital, following an accident to their coach. No details have yet been released but it is believed that some 20 people, including team members Will Raison, Alan Scotthorne, Steve Gardner, Sean Ashby, Stuart Conroy and Des Shipp, were aboard the coach when it crashed, as were Mark Downes and Mark Addy, Drennan Team England International Managers.

 

Drennan Team England has won the competition in five out of the past eight years.

 

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News story 2

You are the web editor for Fishing Today.co.uk, a website that prides itself on its up-to-date news on all things to do with fishing. You are editing this story from your reporter.

 

A coach carrying the Drennan Team England angling team to the 2012 World Nation’s Championship has been involved in an accident on a motorway outside Merida in western Spain. Police and ambulances have been called to the scene and are treating some individuals by the roadside. The coach was travelling from the airport to the team’s hotel.

 

The team are favourites going into the competition, which is due to begin on Friday.

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